Subscribe
RSS
Keywords
Archive
January February March April May June July August September October November (3) December
January February March April May June (1) July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June July August September October November December

Pass It On

November 23, 2012  •  Leave a Comment

At photography workshops we are often asked to share the big WHY we are into photography, and when it comes to my turn there is really no defining moment in time where the light went on in my head that I should get into this business.  Like many of us, it started when we picked up the family camera or maybe a Polaroid or disposable camera and took a few pictures.  As a teenager, a friend showed me his family's photography studio and I got to see what literal burning and dodging a photo was all about. I was fascinated with the process but it looked like an awful lot of tedious work.  Later when my children came along, I, of course, reached for the first camera I could find to capture those fleeting first weeks, months, and years of my children's growth that led me down that photography path. Rather than begin my photography business much later in life,  I wish, however, that someone had taken me under their wing and introduced me to the camera at a very young age, because the technology is speeding by faster than I can keep up with it.  With that thought in mind and two of the little granddaughters spending the night, I decided I would show them what it was like to be on the other side of the camera and not where I always placed them in front of me.  A year apart, they took turns taking each other's pictures and one was more steady, focused, and determined than the other with the little P&S (point and shoot) compact camera i put in their little hands. They had their own posing ideas and couldn't wait for me to show them on the computer or fix the red eye which I explained was like looking into your eyeball so you didn't have to look so spooky.  I am hoping that this becomes an ongoing exercise in fun and learning when they visit their "Paparazzi Nandee."  I encourage all photographers to keep that in mind when you encounter a young inquisitive person at one of your photography sessions.  You never know what seeds you may be planting for the future. 

 


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...